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Blogs

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Technology expert sessions and application insights
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General Information Data protection has a high priority for Infineon and its su...
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Security Bulletin: BLE Security Vulnerabilities CVE-2019-17061 and CVE-2019-16336 (Status Update) Cypress has reviewed and analyzed recent reports on BLE security vulnerabilities outlined in CVE-2019-17061 and CVE-2019-16336, collectively referred to as the SweynTooth Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities have been addressed via firmware updates. Below is the status update: Part CVE Updated FW Release Date PSoC 4 BLE CVE-2019-17061 BLE Component 3.63in PSoC Creator October 2019 CVE-2019-16336 BLE Component 3.64 in PSoC Creator March 2020 PSoC 6 BLE CVE-2019-17061 BLE Middleware 3.30used by ModusToolBox 2.x November 2019 PDL 3.1.1 in PSoC Creator January 2020 CVE-2019-16336 BLE Middleware 3.40used by ModusToolBox 2.x March 2020 PDL 3.1.2in PSoC Creator March 2020 Other Cypress Devices To date, Cypress has not observed vulnerabilities associated with CVE-2019-17061 and CVE-2019-16336 in other devices. Customers using other devices or requiring further assistance can receive support by creating a case through our secure support portal or by contacting their Cypress representative. If you believe you have identified a vulnerability in any Cypress product, please visit our security response page and email the Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) at psirt@cypress.com.
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Security Bulletin: BLE Security VulnerabilitiesCVE-2019-11516 and CVE-2019-13916IntroductionCypress has reviewed and analyzed recent reports on BLE security vulnerabilities outlined in CVE-2019-11516 and CVE-2019-13916. Below is the status update:Part NumberVulnerabilityFixed in ReleaseCYW20735B1CYW43012C0CVE-2019-11516BT SDK2.4CVE-2019-13916BT SDK2.4CYW20706A2CYW20819A1CYW20820A1CYW20719B2CVE-2019-13916BT-SDK2.5Other Cypress DevicesCustomers using devices not listed above or requiring further assistance can receive updates by creating a support case through our secure support portal or by contacting their Cypress representative.The latest BT SDK releases are available for download here. Please contact us directly for consultation and/or patch adoption support.If you believe you have identified a vulnerability in any Cypress product, please visit our security response page and email the Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) at psirt@cypress.com.
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Bringing the Best of Infineon Forums and Cypress Developer Community Together fo...
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Background On May 11th, 2021 the Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) published a series of pote...
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With a Pocket Full of PSoCs, of Course! In mid-March MIT closed their campus due to COVID-19 concerns. Professors and students had only a few days of notice. Professor Steven Leeb did not waste any time putting together a remote series of lab exercises for his 6.115 Microcomputer Project Laboratory students for a revised take-home experience. Students were issued a variety of PSoC 4 and 5 kits to take home and emailed kit guides and take-home lab exercises. No datasheets needed, and practically no other parts. Everything necessary was in Creator and PSoC. Professor Leeb called the PSoC his “desert island part.” According to Professor Leeb, the final project results were spectacular! Judging by these videos, I agree. I have gathered a few of the student’s comments and links to their final project demonstrations below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoS8VW2Qoiw https://youtu.be/U6hL9M0onzA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uF4DDUcMcS8 https://youtu.be/8da7VfPwSLs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPehnXVb3rM&feature=youtu.be “Wanted to reach out and thank you for such a great semester! I came into 6.115 with little to no hardware experience: only soldered once before, never used an oscilloscope or multimeter or power supply, never used a breadboard or microcontroller, never read a datasheet, never used C, etc. Without a doubt, this has been the best class I've taken so far at MIT; not only have I felt like I grew and learned a lot (for example, doing this final project would have been a pipe dream a few months ago), but some of the best moments of this semester for me have been in 38-600, up late at night struggling with friends.” “Thanks for providing such inspiration to all of us in this time of crisis.” “Thank you for an unforgettable class experience, even despite the circumstances. 6.115 is easily the best class I have taken at MIT, and it's definitely inspired me to do more awesome projects with embedded systems.” PSoC Rocks! … and so do You! Patrick
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In less than five years Cypress has sold one billion USB-C® devices. With this...
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Public Statement embargoed for release until August 30th, 2021 Bluetooth Classic Denial of Service Vulnerabilities for IFX Wireless Connectivity Devices Shipped to Customers On May 13, 2021, the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) contacted Infineon Technologies reporting that their research group had found four vulnerabilities that can lead the CYW20735 product to crash and restart if an attacker within the Bluetooth Classic (BT Classic) radio range sends certain unexpected LMP packets. Analysis performed by Infineon on a number of our chipsets supporting BT Classic indicated that these vulnerabilities were valid. Details of these reported vulnerabilities can be found at the following public link: https://asset-group.github.io/disclosures/braktooth/ In response, Infineon developed the relevant patches for these vulnerabilities. These patches have been implemented in BT SDK 3.2, available in late Q4 2021. On August 13, 2022, the SUTD research group reported to Infineon that it had validated the patches for the affected CVE’s. Below is the list of affected CVEs, all of which have patches available for the described vulnerabilities: CVE # as reported Description Devices Affected CVE-2021-34145 Invalid Max Slot Type Infineon Bluetooth stand-alone and Wi-Fi Combo devices CVE-2021-34146 AU Rand Flooding “ CVE-2021-34147 Invalid Timing Accuracy “ CVE-2021-34148 Max Slot Length Overflow “ CVE-2021-TBD Ignore Encryption Stop “ Customers should update their products with the latest Bluetooth SDK. If further assistance is needed, please create a support case through our secure support portal or by contacting their Infineon representative to request an updated SDK. Infineon wishes to thank the Singapore University of Technology and Design for their responsible disclosure of these vulnerabilities and their responsive interaction during the analysis and final testing of the patches described above. If you believe you have identified a vulnerability in any Infineon product, please visit oursecurity responsepage and email the Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) atpsirt@infineon.com.
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Grow in your community journey, as you contribute.
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ModustoolBox (MTB) 2.2 brings with it a new unified workflow for applications. In ModustoolBox 2.0 or ModustoolBox 2.1, BTSDK apps had a different workflow than PSoC6 SDK apps, but with ModustoolBox 2.2, apps using PSoC6/BTSDK/AnyCloud SDK follow the same workflow. In addition to the unified flow, there are some improvements available in MTB 2.2 such as added flexibility in how libraries are managed. It’s necessary to make some changes in MTB 2.0/2.1 BTSDK applications to start using the unified flow in MTB 2.2. This blog will give you migration steps for BTSDK apps from MTB 2.0/2.1 to MTB 2.2 Before we move on to the steps for migration, there are some points to note: An MTB 2.0/2.1 workspace containing BTSDK app and wiced_btsdk 2.7.1 can be used with MTB 2.2 to build/program. If you want to access the library manager features of MTB 2.2, then you must upgrade your application to work with the MTB 2.2 flow. If you are using wiced_btsdk 2.7 or below but have updated to MTB 2.2, applications might break for some BSPs while using MTB 2.2 tools. The solution is to update to wiced_btsdk 2.7.1, or even better, migrate the app to the MTB 2.2 flow. BTSDK MTB 2.1 CEs are not compatible with MTB 2.2. What has changed in BTSDK app structure in MTB 2.2? The first change you will notice is the option to create required apps from the BLE, mesh or HAL group. With MTB 2.1, all apps were created from a given group with no choice. Figure 1 shows the difference in the list of apps for the BLE CE group. Figure 1. MTB 2.0/2.1 CE list(left) and MTB 2.2 CE list(right) in Project Creator In MTB 2.0/2.1, the wiced_btsdk repo needed to be cloned into the workspace before creating the application. In MTB 2.2, there is no need to create wiced_btsdk prior to the creation of app. The BTSDK apps include .mtb files for the Board Support Package (BSP) and the required libraries for the BSP are automatically detected and cloned into the shared library folder (mtb_shared) or in the libs folder in the project. Figures 2.1 and 2.2 show the difference. Figure 2.1. MTB 2.0/2.1 workspace vs MTB 2.2 BTSDK workspace Figure 2.2. MTB 2.0/2.1 BTSDK CE folder vs MTB 2.2 BTSDK CE folder The BSP and libraries can be shared or can reside locally in the project. When we say shared, it means that, all the apps created in the same workspace will use the same copy of the common libraries from the mtb_shared folder. New copies of the same shared libraries are not created for every new app. Use library manager 1.2 to make a BSP/library local or shared as shown in Figure 3 by selecting/deselecting the shared checkbox. Figure 3. Screenshot of library manager 1.2 to select a BSP/Library and make it shared or localIf the BSP/library is shared, it will be created in the mtb_shared/wiced_btsdk folder. If the BSP/library is not shared, then it will be created in the libs folder in the project. Steps to migrate an MTB 2.0/2.1 BTSDK application to the MTB 2.2 workflow Makefile ChangesThe makefile has changed significantly for BTSDK applications. Download the makefile and make changes to the following makefile variables according to your app: a. TARGET – the default target b. APPNAME – name of your project c. Copy any other app specific makefile variable from your MTB 2.0/2.1 CE makefile d. Save the makefile with the changes e. Copy this makefile and replace with the existing one in your app folder Adding deps folder and BSP/libraries to the applicationLibrary manager 1.2 must be used to add or update any BSP or libraries. Launch the library manager 1.2 tool from the start menu or go to the MTB installation folder and navigate to this path: ModusToolbox\tools_2.2\library-manager. From here launch the library manager 1.2 tool.a. Select the directory of your application using the browse option as shown in Figure 4.Figure 4. Screenshot of Library Manager 1.2 highlighting the ‘browse’ optionAlternately, from the command line (modus-shell on Windows or from a command window on MacOS or Linux), navigate to the project directory and enter “make modlibs”. This will launch the library manager and will provide the correct directory.b. Next, select the required BSP from the ‘BSP’ tab. The dependency libraries are selected automatically. Select any other required libraries (ex: mesh, HID etc…) from the ‘Libraries’ tab.c. Click on the update button at the bottom right corner of the library manager. Wait for it to successfully update the BSP and libraries. d. Close the library manager. Now you can observe that in your project folder two new folders called deps and libs are added. Deps and libs contain the .mtb files of the BSP/libraries you selected in previous step and the dependency libraries, respectively.e. In the project directory, you can see that a new folder called ‘mtb_shared’ is created. If you navigate inside the folder into wiced_btsdk, you can see the BSP/library folders downloaded. This is the shared library that we talked about earlier in the blog. Update the Readme file of your project if required. Update the .gitignore file in your app if present. You can refer to the example .gitignore file. This is useful if you are maintaining your project on github. Open the .cybt file present in your app with bt-configurator 2.20.0 tool (can be launched from the start menu or found in the MTB installation folder: ModusToolbox\tools_2.2\bt-configurator). Check the notice list in the bt-configurator for any changes required. If required, do the necessary changes and save the file.Alternately, from the command line (modus-shell on Windows or from a command window on MacOS or Linux), navigate to the project directory and enter “make config_bt”. This will launch the Bluetooth configurator and will open the .cybt file. All required changes have now been done for your app to work with the MTB 2.2 unified workflow. If desired, you can import your project into the Eclipse IDE for MTB 2.2 using the Eclipse IDE for MTB 2.2 menu item File > Import > ModusToolbox > ModusToolbox Application Import. Now you can build/clean/program/debug your application from the IDE and use any MTB 2.2 tool. You can use library manager 1.2 to update your app to use local/shared library or add/remove any BSP/library. IMPORTANT NOTE With wiced_btsdk 2.8, if you add more than one BSP to a project, the build will result in an error. Refer to the Bluetooth SDK 2.8 Release Notes. To work with a different BSP, use library manager and remove (deselect) the older BSP, select the new BSP and update. Note that in a single project you can have only the BSP/BSPs of the same chip, but in a workspace if you have two or more projects, each one can use a different BSP.
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Our friend, Matt Mielke at Dig-Key, just wrote a really good blog about using CMSIS-DSP on PSoC 6. It is one of those really good articles that just gets on with the job of describing the subject without a load of unnecessary, showy-offy acronyms and buzzwords. I really liked it and recommend you give it a read. Unless you really like slow math in your programs. Ok, then... good luck with that. I liked that it methodically explains what the library does and how it helps, uses the CMSIS-PACK plug-in that ships with ModusToolbox to install the library, then adds it to the project and sets the include path up. In case you have never seen it, here is an image showing the Pack Manager after the library has been installed - it is a great way to install libraries and keep them up to date. I only thought of one thing I would add to the article. Matt explains the difference between hardfp and softfp libraries, and points out that you cannot mix-and-match them. But I'd also add that you need to remember that when choosing other middleware for your application. Here is a picture of the ModusToolbox Middleware Selector... notice the CapSense and Segger emWin entries that list a Hard FP and Soft FP implementation... you need to make sure all those match your DSP library selection. Did you finish reading it yet? Good, wasn't it?